Jonathan Latiano

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I’m loving this piece by Jonathan Latiano titled, “With Fond Regards from the Holecene Epoch.”  The angled light resembles a plummeting commet thirsting for contact, or death.

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Tokujin Yoshioka

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Like a dozer from Fraggle Rock, Tokujin Yoshioka labors away creating enormous nests woven from thousands of plastic straws.  His installations transform gallery spaces into surreal recycling centers mimicking a gust of snow caught in a freeze frame, whorls wrapping about columns.  Or a crystalized hedge of unworldly bramble daring exploration into a synthetic garden, sterile and inviting.

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Urs Fischer

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I love installation art which uses the gallery space to enhance a piece.  In Urs Fischer’s case, he achieves the illusion of removing the gallery itself to create a feeling a emptiness.  His 2007 installation, “You” invites the viewer into a field of loss, where a world has been torn down and left to rubble.

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Kumi Yamashita

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Using only a single piece of thread and thousands of galvanized nails, Kumi Yamashita’s latest piece in her Constellation Series titled, Mana #2, is a stunning display of portraiture through non-traditional materials.

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Cha Jongrye

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Using organic material to create organic imagery, Cha Jong-Rye’s large scale sculptures evoke the birthing of natural forms from a place unseen.  Her pieces seem like cross sections of cave walls rendered in layered copse.  You want to run your hands over them as if deciphering complexly coded braille.  Like communing with the Earth; sitting at it’s feet and hearing of our origin story told first hand.

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Rune Guneriussen

Wouldn’t it be cool if after people disappear from the planet all of our possessions go feral?  It’s like the Brave Little Toaster loosed to the wild.  Photographer Rune Guneriussen lends anthropomorphic qualities to household objects in natural (or would it be unnatural?) settings.   His shots have the surreal quality of accidentally walking in on fairies dancing in a glen.  He’s like the National Geographic of  the Sears catalogue.

Dan Witz

I wholly admit that I have a short tether to technology, in this day and age it’s hard to go longer than a day without going online.  Dan Witz’s portraiture series shows that even though we feel more connected than ever through modern communication, it really is the opposite.  His paintings portray how disengaged and alone we are as we look deep into the light up screens of our favorite machines.  Each character seems lost and unhappy but unwilling to stop, like an addict.  We need our phones, we don’t know how to communicate without them.

Rashad Alakbarov

Color is just the way we perceive light.  Rashad Alakbarov’s installations use direct light sources to create art through shadows and colored plastic.  He’s not the first artist I’ve seen to use shadows to create images,  but he’s the first to use it to make “paintings”.